6 Best Motorcycle Routes in Australia

Australia is renowned for being one of the best countries in the world for riding a motorcycle. This is because of the thousands of miles of beautiful and scenic roads that are unlike any other roads in the world. Many of these roads have a low volume of traffic, making them safer for motorcycle riders that roads that are heavily traveled. The following roads are suitable for styles of motorcycles such as choppers, cruisers and touring bikes.

Let’s take a look at some of the best motorcycle routes in Australia!

1. Traralgon to Licola

Traralgon to Licola Motorcycle Route AustraliaThis is a fun ride that will take between one and two hours in the West Gippsland region of Victoria. There will be several corners that are tight. You will need to be cautious on this route. A few of the corners are extremely sharp hairpin turns. Some of these are blind turns, so there is no need to be a daredevil. Ride carefully and make it to the end in one piece. This is a nice route for advanced riders, although new riders can still enjoy it at a slower pace. Look out for wombats while you are on this trek. There is a licensed shop and a caravan park at the end of the route.

Length: 118km

Directions

  • Traralgon to Glengarry
  • Continue to Cowwarr
  • Left towards Seaton
  • Left towards Licola

2. Blue Mountains Loop

Blue Mountains Loop motorcycle route Sydney AustraliaThis ride will begin in western Sydney and take you through the Blue Mountains. If you decide to ride straight through without any stops along the way, you can do it in four hours. While this is an ideal ride to take on the weekend, there is much less traffic along this route in the middle of the week.

Length: 210km

Directions

  • Take Windsor Rd from Parramatta. Head towards Richmond. Get on Bell Line Road to Bell.
  • Left past the weigh station towards Mt. Victoria.
  • Once you reach Mt. Victoria, make a left to get on the Great Western Highway. This will take you back to Parramatta.

3. Maitland to Batemans Bay

Maitland to Batemans Bay Motorcycle Route Australia

If you are interested in an extended journey, this is one you should consider. This route has 18 hours of riding time, not counting the time you spend to see the sights on the way. Because of this, it takes most people four days to complete it. There are so many thing to see along the way, so this is not a ride you want to rush through. The surfaces of the roads on this journey are very good quality. The police are usually looking for speeders as you get closer to the coast. However, when you are around Goulburn and going towards Canberra, be on the lookout for speed traps. The Oriental Hotel at Mudgee and the Taragla Hotel at Taragla are places that welcome bikers and are regular stops for people on this route.

Length: 1,240km

Directions
Begin in Maitland and ride south towards the Central Coast.

4. Healesville to Narbethong

Healesville to Narbethong motorcycle route australiaThis is one of the most famous roads for riding a motorcycle in the Yarra Ranges. While on this journey, be mindful of a heavy police presence on the Black Spur. The surface of the road is almost flawless and perfect for riding. There is an equal combination of sweeping turns and tight corners, so there is a little something for everyone. There is also some gorgeous forest scenery to enjoy along this stretch of road.

Length: 17km

Directions
Begin in Healesville and head northeast along the B360 towards Narbethong.

5. Mildura to Red Cliffs

Mildura to Red Cliffs Australia motorcycle route

This route is the most ideal way to reach Red Cliffs when riding from Mildura. There are numerous corners that need to be taken at a variety of speeds. You should be aware that gravel is frequently reported on the road along this route, so be mindful of this. There are also a few bumps along the way. This is generally considered to be one of the top roads for biking in Sunraysia. This is also one of a small group of roads in the Sunraysia region that contains a nice amount of corners.

Length: 25km

Directions

  • Begin your ride on Deacon Avenue in Mildura.
  • Turn right onto Seventh Street East that connects to Cureton Avenue.
  • The journey ends in Red Cliffs

 6. Liverpool to Belmore Falls

Liverpool to Belmore Falls Australia Motorcycle Route

This ride will take you through Camden and towards the southern highlands. There are many places to stop along the way if you get hungry. The scenery is beautiful and the roads are all well maintained. Just like some of the other top motorcycle routes in Australia, there is far less traffic in the middle of the week, so keep this in mind. One of the best things about this particular riding route is that you can ride it during any time of the year. It is also close to Sydney, so tourists might also consider taking this journey. The ride can be completed in roughly two hours.

Length: 133km

Directions

  • Take the Camden Valley Way to Camden.
  • Continue on Old Hume Highway over Razor Back and into Picton.
  • Exit towards Thrilmere and continue towards Bowral.
  • Follow the signs to Kangaroo Valley.
  • Left at Illawarra highway.
  • Continue to Burrawang exit. Go towards Wilds Meadow.
  • Follow signs to Belmore Falls.
This post comes from Jay, who secured finance on a motorcycle at Brisbane Motorcycles and road it all the way to Sydney. Check out their servicing tips here.
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5 Stupidly Simple Ways to Be a Safer Motorcyclist

We all know the dangers of riding a motorcycle and it’s something we all shy away from talking about. But let’s be mature about this: there are ways to make riding less of a risk, and we should talk about it more than we do. So let’s do it…

Here are 5 ways to make your motorcycling life that little bit safer, no matter what type of bike you ride.

motorcycle training courses in London

1. Make sure you have appropriate riding gear

It sounds stupidly obvious, but the gear you wear can save your life.

Gloves: If you fell off your bike, the first thing you’d do would be to put your hands out – that’s why you need gloves – yes, even if it’s a hot day!

Trousers: Have you ever seen road-rash? At only 60mph, a fall could remove up to a centimeter-deep layer of your skin. Seriously, just wear some proper bike trousers.

Jacket: A good jacket, with body armour and rugged material could save your skin and keep you out of a wheelchair and on your bike. It’ll also keep you warm and dry too, which make riding more pleasurable – riding in a t-shirt doesn’t look that cool, anyway, so just put on a bloody jacket!

Helmet: I don’t need to talk you through this one.

2. Never ride in awful weather

Not only can rain and other weather conditions interfere with your ability to see when you are driving, it will dramatically increase your chances of slipping off the road and into a ditch. And anyway, riding is better in the sunshine!

3.  Avoid driving when you are tired

You need to be about ten times more alert when riding a motorcycle as you do when driving a car. Why? Because you have to ride defensively – most people won’t even see you, so you need to be prepared to move out of their way. It’s a sad but simple truth. You must concentrate on your own driving, and be alert to other drivers and pedestrians on the roadway.

4. Always work on your riding skills – you can always be better

Part of riding a bike is the feeling you get when you feel totally in-tune with your machine. But this only comes with practice and dedication. Invest in riding courses, whether on-road and/or off-road and equip yourself with the riding skills to take you anywhere on the planet. I recently took a motorcycle training course in London, where I now live, to help me feel more confident whilst riding in the stressful city streets. Don’t be “too big” to sign up; it’s all about being a better rider – it was a lot of fun too!

5. Take your time… it’s not a race

Riding with mates can be  lot of fun but it often leads to accidents. Picture the scene: you mate swings by your house and you take off on a day’s ride. He’s been riding for twenty years, you’ve been riding for 2 years. He has his knee down at every turn and is popping wheelies on every straight – you feel like you have to keep up. No one wants to be the “slow and boring” riding partner.

But hell, wouldn’t you prefer to stay alive and be considered the “slow and boring” riding partner than being dead and never riding again?

Seriously, take your time, enjoy your day’s ride at your own pace. It’s not the MotoGP.

Do you have any other riding tips? Leave them in the comments section below or join us on Facebook!

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What is Motorcycle Gap Insurance, Anyway?

Wondering if you need motorcycle gap insurance? Someone trying to pressure you into buying it? Wondering what it’s all about?

Well fear not, my fellow rider, for here is everything you need to know (and I mean EVERYTHING)!

Robbie-Maddison-Corinth-Canal

You may think that having fully comprehensive insurance would give you maximum protection in this worst-case scenario. An insurer can write off a vehicle where it has been damaged by fire or floods, stolen and unrecovered, involved in an accident.

The unfortunate reality is the bike will have lost money as soon as it was driven away from the dealership and will continue to depreciate over time. Some of the worst depreciating motorbikes can lose almost 50% of their original value leaving you severely out of pocket compared to what you paid for the bike initially. Any settlement from your insurance company will only reflect the depreciated value of your motorcycle.

In addition, if you bought the motorbike on finance the total owing could be more than your insurer’s settlement leaving you supplementing this amount yourself – whilst still having to look at buying a new bike.

The good news is that you don’t have to find yourself in this situation. You are able to purchase Guaranteed Asset Protection – otherwise known as GAP – which protects you from financial loss in the event of a total loss or write off.

Is GAP Insurance worth buying?
If your motorcycle is involved in an accident the likelihood of the bike sustaining severe damage is more likely than with a car. Bikes are also easier to steal than cars. These two factors combined mean that motorbikes are more likely to be written off and so present a much higher risk for owners and insurers alike.

The average purchase price of a motorbike amounts to £9922, whilst an average claim settlement comes to just under £3,000. It’s a sobering thought that your bike can lose as much as 30% of its original value and you can ensure that – for as little as £159- your wallet doesn’t suffer if your pride and joy is stolen or involved in an accident.

Some GAP policies also cover up to £1500 of factory fitted extras that you paid for when you bought the bike.

How does a Back to Invoice Plus+ policy work?
Taking an independent GAP provider ala.co.uk as an example, you can purchase their Motorcycle Back to Invoice Plus+ policy. This is suitable for vehicles bought from a VAT registered dealer and purchased outright or on finance whether obtained through the dealership or a personal loan.  A policy can be purchased for vehicles less than 10 years old that has been delivered in the last 180 days.

If the vehicle is written off the GAP policy will pay from your insurance company’s settlement back up to the original invoiced amount you paid for the vehicle. Any finance on the motorbike is cleared by the insurer, the GAP insurer or a combination of the two if required and the amount remaining once that has been paid is yours to do with as you wish.

Read the T & C’s!
It’s easy to see that GAP insurance can save you thousands of pounds if you’re unfortunate enough to have your motorbike written off. It is important when buying GAP, as with all insurance, to look at the wording of the policy to know you’re getting exactly what you pay for.

You don’t have to pay excessive premiums
Most people are offered GAP insurance by the dealer when they purchase their motorbike. If you have been in that situation GAP may have sounded like a great idea, but at an average cost of £299, is an overly large expense.

There are alternatives to buying policies from the dealer – online GAP companies can provide highly competitive, good value quotes.

It is equally important not to be taken in by the cheapest policies available. They often contain hidden clauses and restrictions (see below) limiting any settlement you might receive based on the Glass’s Guide Retail Value of the bike at the time of the write off, which may not reflect the settlement you actually receive from your insurer.

Avoid Market Value Clauses and Glass’s Guide Maximum Payout Clauses
If a GAP policy contains these clauses you may not receive the amount you expect from a claim

Some GAP insurers use Glass’s Guide Retail Value as the absolute figure that your insurance company should settle at. This is not always the case as insurers can use different sources which produce assorted valuations. Where the insurer settles at a lower figure than that given in Glass’s Guide, you can then end up with a shortfall despite buying an insurance designed to avoid that situation.

There are only a few companies that do not use these clauses and instead simply pay the difference between your insurance company’s settlement (even if it is lower than Glass’ Guide) and the original amount you paid for the bike – giving you total peace of mind.

Free transfers
If you decide to change your motorbike before your GAP policy expires, a reputable company should allow you to transfer your policy – without any nasty admin fees.

This is usually done using a pro rata calculation of any unused premium remaining in the policy, which is then deducted from the price of a new policy. All you have to pay is the balance leftover and you get a brand new policy without having to pay the full amount.

UK based, UK underwriters
For most people it is important to buy GAP insurance from a UK based provider with UK based underwriters. These companies should be full authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and should be members of the Financial Services Compensation Scheme. This protects you and your policy in the event the underwriter ceases trading.

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10 Adventurous Questions with Patrick from Unleashyouradventure.com

Patrick has some heavy-weight adventure touring experience under his belt and, along with his girlfriend Shellie, also runs the awesome adventure blog, Unleashyouradventure.com. It’s always good to hear about other people’s stories from the road, so I decided to ask him a few questions to find out more about his touring adventures. Check out his inspirational modesty and see how it’s possible to ride the world, even if you aren’t a millionaire maverick.

unleashyouradventure-Patrick

1. How old were you when you first got your licence and what was the trigger for you to do so?

I was 18 and got the bike licence together with my car licence. My dad had one so I needed one too.

2. You’re really lucky to have a girlfriend who shares your passion for bikes. Do you and Sherrie plan all of your trips together, or does one of you take charge when it comes to deciding where you’ll be going next? Do you ever miss riding solo?

We plan the trips together and to be honest there is not so much planning at all. For our last trip , we just decided to ride East until we hit Newfoundland and so we did. Sherrie rides her own bike so I can still take an extra tour when I feel like it.

3. You guys both have a BMW F 650 GS each, which I’ve ridden myself and loved, was there a reason neither of you went for the 1200? Would you ever be tempted?

Yes I give you 3 reasons: Money, Weight and Height. We’d rather spend the money on the trip than on a fancy bike, a smaller bike is much better off road and Sherrie is not the tallest. She perfectly fits on the F650. But yes, I was tempted, but not by a 1200 GS but by real offroad bikes, especially in Mongolia.

4. What has been your single most memorable motorcycle adventure?

Crossing the interior of Iceland. A very challenging but also amazing trip. We saw the incredible landscape of Iceland’s interior but had also to deal with storms, a sunk motorcycle and a blown tire accident which brought us to hospital.

5. You guys both have some seriously heavy-weight touring experience; what would you say the biggest challenges have been whilst riding in far off lands? It must be really stressful trying to buy a bike when you aren’t in your own country. What about sorting out insurance?

The biggest challenge? Get your ass up and go! Once you are on the road everything usually falls into place. The hardest part is to set a date and hit the road. We had some difficulties to buy new bikes in South East Asia but I wouldn’t call it stressful rather than a challenge. We had health insurance with world wide coverage and got a bike insurance where it was required.

6. What’s the smallest budget you have survived off whilst on a long-distance journey?

Our normal budget was 30 EUR/day in South East Asia. You could get away with half of it if you had to. I met a guy in Argentina who lived off 10 EUR/day including gas. That was pretty extreme I guess.

7. Your blog is inspiring for anyone interested in long-distance touring. How do you manage it whilst out on the road? Do you take a laptop with you and blog en route, or do you just take notes and write it all up when you get back?

We had two netbooks with us and updated on the fly. Internet is good in most countries. Before that we had only one laptop and we ended up fighting over it all the time.

8. How do you manage having a full-time career with your need to take off on round-the-world trips?

Sherrie works as a freelance English teacher and I was an IT consultant. Now I took up the challenge to create the best travel search engine for Europe, GoEuro which does not leave much room for travelling at the moment.

9. Looking to the future, how do you see you passion for bikes and adventure evolving? Will you be toning it down or revving it up!

We got a daughter last spring so travelling is a bit on hold, but not for that much longer ;-)

10. Have you ever had any close calls that have made you stop and reconsider your motorcycle obsession?

Yes, I had two accidents with blown tires and a pillion. In both accidents we could have been killed, thank god nothing happened besides a few bruises. But when I came home after 14 months of travelling I walked up the stairs to my parents house and broke my foot.

Thanks for your time Patrick, I for one will be following your adventures – best of luck and please keep us all updated!

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Would You Like to Win Davida Retro Products Every Month?

Then sign-up to the Davida newsletter by clicking on the helment below….

Davida is a well-known motorcycle helmet brand that has been going for more than 30 years, hand-making their helmets right here in the UK. With iconic styles that are beautifully put together, it is hard not to love them. Davida also do motorcycle clothing, accessories and goggles, and you could win a bunch of their stuff by simply clicking on the helmet below and signing up to the awesome David newsletter. Good luck! and ride safe!

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